VBWG
Monograph

Vascular Biology in Clinical Practice © Vol. 1, No. 3

• From hypertension to LVH and heart failure

Participants at recent Vascular Biology Working Group meetings have reviewed and provided significant direction in the development of this slide/lecture program entitled The endothelium: New insights into the origins and treatment of CAD.

These program materials present a complete update of the basic science and clinical trials that are bringing advances in knowledge of the endothelium into the daily practice of medicine. The latest studies on the endothelium, the growing importance of bradykinin, and the prognostic role for endothelial function are included. Important new information is also presented on angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonism, ACE inhibition for the treatment of heart failure, and trials that extend the role of tissue ACE inhibition into new patient populations.

Introduction

The information in this slide/lecture program represents an update on the endothelium and its role in cardiovascular health and disease, probably the most exciting area in cardiology today.

The information covers new data extending the knowledge presented in the first volume of this series and in other programs that have helped characterize the endothelium as the gatekeeper of vascular structure and function. The endothelium has been demonstrated to be critically important in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and other vascular conditions. Every risk factor for cardiovascular disease is also associated with impaired endothelial function. As our understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease evolves, our treatment algorithms should be updated. This program includes current findings in vascular pathophysiology and clinical trials that are turning the science of vascular biology into clinical practice.




CME_Answer_ Sheet.pdf (0.3MB)CME_Answer_ Sheet.pdf (0.3MB)
CME_Monograph.pdf (1.8MB)CME_Monograph.pdf (1.8MB)
CME_Test.pdf (0.0MB)CME_Test.pdf (0.0MB)

This slide/lecture program has been developed under the auspices of the Vascular Biology Working Group. The goal of these programs is to educate healthcare professionals on the contemporary role of the endothelium as a key to cardiovascular health, and to spur exploration of therapeutic interventions capable of improving endothelial function and thereby help reduce the incidence of adverse outcomes.

Published by Medical Education Consultants, Inc. (MEDCON), on behalf of the University of Florida College of Medicine. Supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Pfizer Inc.

Copyright © 2000.

The editorial content of this program expresses the views of the individual contributors and does not necessarily reflect the views or recommendations of the University of Florida College of Medicine, Pfizer, or the publisher. The indications and dosages of drugs discussed in this program may vary from those approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The reader is advised to consult the full prescribing information for each medication prior to use.

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Related at vwbg.org

Core Curriculum

The endothelium: New insights into the origins and treatment of CAD

Participants at recent Vascular Biology Working Group meetings have reviewed and provided significant direction in the development of this slide/lecture program entitled The endothelium: New insights into the origins and treatment of CAD.

Vascular Biology in Clinical Practice © Vol. 1, No. 1

The endothelium: Redefining the origins of cardiovascular disease

This CME monograph is the first in a series of educational programs aimed at taking the mystery out of vascular biology and making it relevant to patient care.

Vascular Biology in Clinical Practice © Vol. 7, No. 1

ACE Inhibition in CAD Patients: Expanding the Reach of Cardioprotection

This monograph, ACE Inhibition in CAD Patients: Expanding the Reach of Cardioprotection , which is being offered as part of a series of continuing medical education activities from the University of Florida College of Medicine.
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